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02/09/2013

Selfie


Last week the Oxford Dictionary crew announced that they were adding the word 'selfie' into their 2013 edition. This made me smile, not because I take ridiculous amounts of photos of myself anyway before uploading onto Instagram, but because it's like watching the world evolve in front of me.  Little, tiny movements every year that appear as a big change when looking back in fifty years time.  



There's been outrage that text speak, such as 'srsly', have been added to the dictionary - claiming it's an outrage to correct grammar and speech.  But to me, this is just our language developing!  How many women get romanced with words such as  'my love for you resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary' anymore? I mean, c'mon, it's more likely to be 'you're alright you are' from my chap!  The point is, language has moved on from where it was in 1846 and we no longer make declarations of love flowered with metaphors and elongated statements.  This is the evolution of language.
Who would have though that the power of social media would lead to popular hashtags becoming recognised by the Oxford Dictionary?  




As I sit here, recovering from a carvery food baby (another term added to the OD this week), I can't help but marvel at the English language.  It amazes me that through common use a word can still be 'created' and wide spread amongst many nations with the native tongue, still to this day when the language has been long established.  My love of words and their power lead me to study English Literature, directing me to favourite authors such as Emily Bronte, Jane Austen, Chares Dickens and Rudyard Kipling (yes, I adore Victorian literature!).  I wonder at what point I'll be reading a classic novel with the words 'she angled the camera so her light was perfection for her selfie, her sweat glistening from twerking to Miley Cyrus earlier and her belly slightly rounded from her food baby'.

Brilliant.



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